Posted by: sarahegner | August 20, 2014

Coral Outplanting at Grecian Rocks

During the past two days, MarineLab staff has been assisting the Coral Restoration Foundation in outplanting 300 (!!!) staghorn corals to Grecian Rocks reef.  MarineLab will be monitoring the restoration site monthly for the next year and sending CRF the necessary data  (% survival, disease, predation, bleaching, etc.).

The first stop was to CRF's nursery by the Elbow to collect fragments for outplanting.

The first stop was to CRF’s nursery by the Elbow to collect fragments for outplanting.

CRF uses "trees" to hang coral fragments.  They have found this to be the most efficient method, keeping the corals off of the bottom where they are more greatly affected by sediment, nutrients and predators.

CRF uses “trees” to hang coral fragments. They have found this to be the most efficient method, keeping the corals off of the bottom where they are more greatly affected by sediment, nutrients and predators.

CRF has genetic information for all of the corals.  The frags being outplanted must be tagged according to genotype once removed from the tree.

CRF has genetic information for all of the corals. The frags being outplanted must be tagged according to genotype once removed from the tree.

The corals are then crated for transport to the outplant site

The corals are then crated for transport to the outplant site

Staghorn babies enjoying their boat ride from the nursery to their forever home.

Staghorn babies enjoying their boat ride from the nursery to their forever home.

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The first step is choosing a site and chiseling at the substrate in order to have bare limestone for the epoxy to adhere to.

The first step is choosing a site and chiseling at the substrate in order to have bare limestone for the epoxy to adhere to.

Coral fragments are attached to the limestone substrate using a two part epoxy.

Coral fragments are attached to the limestone substrate using a two part epoxy.

Each site has a cluster of 10 coral fragments, all of the same genotype.

Each site has a cluster of 10 coral fragments, all of the same genotype.

Each site is tagged so that all of the corals can be monitored and maintained.

Each site is tagged so that all of the corals can be monitored and maintained.

It sure is fun to restore peace to our underwater world.

It sure is fun to restore peace to our underwater world.

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Responses

  1. […] In collaboration with the Coral Restoration Foundation, MarineLab staff outplanted 300 staghorn corals in August of 2014.  We planted 30 colonies, 10 corals each with 5 different genotypes represented at our site.   You can read about outplanting here. […]


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